Tag Archives: coping strategies

10 tips to keep your sanity when you have chronic health problems

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Living with chronic health problems and long-term illness can push you to your limits physically, which in turn, can send you over the edge mentally. Having lived with Neutropenia and M.E (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) for many years now, I can verify that these illnesses have threatened to crack my sanity and spirit like a boiled egg shell hit repeatedly with a spoon.

In order to get through the rest of my life with some semblance of my mental health intact, I’ve developed several ways of coping and getting by that I’d like to share with you today.

1) There’s a lot of advice floating around about ‘accepting’ your situation and coming to terms with it and that’s all very well and good if you can do it. After 17 years of illness however, I am no closer to accepting it than I was at the beginning. I’ve now decided to accept that I can’t accept it and deal with that instead. I believe it’s healthier to feel all your feelings, even if the so-called negative ones such as anger, frustration, bitterness, envy, loss or regret. What I’ve discovered is that these feelings are fluid anyway and it’s impossible to stay feeling any one thing forever. If I allow the feelings to come without saying ‘I should have accepted this by now!’ they usually pass of their own accord and then I can get on with making the best of things.

2) Work out what your physical and mental limits in life are and stick to them. This is a lot more difficult than it sounds, but I’ve learned the hard way that ‘pushing myself’ is no longer an option. I’m done with payback and exhaustion from not listening to my mind and body.

3) In order to achieve 2) do not listen or pay attention to anyone who thinks you should be doing more. This is also a lot more difficult than it sounds but unless someone has the exact same conditions as you which affect them in the exact same ways, they have no place advising you on anything.

3) Forget about rigid time-management and organising your life. I tried this for years after I first got sick thinking it would help me maximise the time when I was well. What happened was that I had to change my plans and alter deadlines so much due to the unpredictable nature of my illness that I ended up feeling like a failure who couldn’t get things done. As difficult as it sounds, ‘going with the flow’ is a better mental approach for me than putting expectations on myself that I can’t live up to.

4) Prioritise instead and then you will be able to live with the lack of order in your life. My priorities are my health/self-care, work, partner, friends and family ( all at the top together ) Sadly, my goals and ambitions have to be lower priority because it’s just common sense that I can’t do everything at the pace I want to. Hence the sporadic blog posts, the years it took me to start getting my writing published and the YouTube channel that I’m desperate to develop, but which is moving along at a snail’s pace. Everything else like housework, decorating, crafts, reading etc is lumped together at the bottom of my priorities because if I kept up with them at the level I would like, the top priorities would suffer. Travel is nowhere on my list of priorities, even though if I was well I’d love to travel more. It takes so much energy that it is permanently on a back burner. Even going away for a few days results in payback and massive exhaustion. Trying to do everything will definitely send you insane.

5) If anyone has the audacity to say to your face they don’t believe your illness exists or that you aren’t really that sick, there are two simple steps you can follow. One is to talk to them and try to educate them about your illness and if this doesn’t work, you can go straight  to step two which is to remove them from your life via the nearest available exit. If that’s too brutal for you, try a gradual ‘phasing out’ so that you see and talk to them a lot less. These people are called ‘naysayers’ and they are one of the biggest threats to your sanity

6) Indulge yourself often. Living with health problems is 20 times more difficult than living a normal life, so regular treats are essential to stop insanity showing up on your radar. For me it’s clothes and I don’t care if I have too many or don’t need any more. I work very hard to keep my job whilst feeling awful and so if I spot a new leopard print item, I’m having it.

7) NEVER compare yourself to anyone else who is well. Comparing yourself to someone who is well is futile and also a bit silly. You might as well open the door to insanity and offer it a cup of tea.

8) Don’t feel you have to put on a brave face worse still, be ‘inspirational’. All of this can take energy and make you more ill from the effort.

9) But don’t moan a lot either, because this can also be very draining, for you and everyone else.

10) ‘Big up’ yourself and remember to congratulate yourself regularly on the achievement of surviving health issues. Not going insane takes considerable effort which can’t be underestimated. I said ‘well done’ to myself nine times yesterday!

“Fail to plan and you plan to fail” – coping strategies for when life turns nasty.

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One of the most reliable things about life is that you can count on it to fuck you over at some point. Whether that is through difficult life events, relationships or circumstances, it is rare to sail through to old age completely unscathed.

I’ve employed various coping mechanisms over the years to deal with depression, anxiety, long-term health problems and a variety of other difficult things that came my way. Some of them were good and some were very bad indeed. Before I received proper therapy and support and got to know myself inside out, my coping strategies included heavy drinking, over-eating, self-harm, exuberant credit fuelled shopping sprees and hanging out with people who were as fucked up as I was, or worse. I’ve always had an invisible sign on my head saying ‘Come meet me!’ that only the seriously messed up could read.

It’s taken me the best part of 25 years to rid myself of all this destruction and find more helpful and less damaging ways to cope with life and the problems I’ve faced.

I’m proud of the fact that I haven’t carried out any of the above unhelpful methods of coping for many many years. These days, I am sober and eat healthily, the credit cards have been banished and my friends are either completely normal (whatever that is) or of a pretty similar level of battiness to how I am now.

Although I am on a stable footing at the moment, I’ve learnt that I must always have coping strategies hard-wired into my brain. Staying on top of mental and physical health problems requires vigilence, discipline and self-awareness. It’s not a very relaxing life, but it’s one I feel in control of.

Perhaps the most important factor in coping is your belief system and attitude. I’ve always believed things would get better, even when they were fucking terrible. No matter how improbable it seemed, I knew that if I didn’t believe this I would be doomed. Having this belief opens you up to things which may help and improve your situation. If you don’t believe things will get better, you dismiss or don’t even notice anything good that comes your way. Running closely alongside this belief is to categorically believe there will always be SOMETHING that you can do to improve your situation, no matter how small and insignificant it may seem. After noticing I am still alive and prospering after many years of hell, it is now part of my coping hard-wiring to believe that I will get through any future shit that comes my way.

Another important coping strategy is fine-tuned self-awareness. I’ve learnt to recognise all my own signs of stress, depression and being overwhelmed. It’s been very important to me in coping with problems to recognise when I am NOT coping.

If I feel I am not coping, I have learned by trial and error that certain actions will always help. Talking about it to someone I am close with can often stop any problems dead in their tracks. Learning that some people are better than others to talk to has been a key development in my life. As was letting go of the expectation that certain people ‘should’ be there for me. I wish I’d known 20 years ago to just give up if people don’t offer their time, attention and support freely.

A branch of this coping mechanism is to never isolate myself if going through a tough time. I have a tendency to get right in my own head, over-analyse things and feel very intensely overloaded indeed when I am alone. I know that to maintain my current and future sanity I must police how much time I spend sans company. I also know now that I cope with life best when I am not living on my own. I’ve tried it 3 times, even though I vowed after the first time never to do it again. All 3 times I did it, I was completely unable to deal with what life threw at me. I think I felt I ‘should’ be able to conquer it, but it’s just not for me. It brings out my absolute worst self and you should all hit me around the head with a wet fish if you ever hear me planning to do it again. Maybe for other people, a break from the world is exactly what’s needed and living on your own suits you. The important thing is to know yourself and your needs and listen to them.

Another favourite coping strategy is acceptance coupled with being realistic. Don’t get me wrong, by acceptance I don’t mean settling back and not doing anything about your situation. I’m a firm believer in taking postive action and making changes if you can. I’m talking about accepting things that you can’t really change, like other people or a lifelong health problem. It’s taken me a long time to learn, but I’ve realised that you can waste a whole lot of energy fighting things instead of working within the boundaries of what you have been dealt. It’s about accepting when you have changed everything you possibly can and being realistic about the world, life and your situation.

There are so many other things I’ve found useful and helpful that I could carry on indefinitely. The coping mechanisms I’ve mentioned above are top of the list but there are many others such as keeping a routine, eating well, writing and having a bar of soap from Lush in the bathroom at all times.

It’s all about taking responsibility and being honest with yourself, identifying what helps and what doesn’t. What works for someone else might not work for you. I’ve been advised numerous times to do Yoga and meditation for example, but they don’t help me. I end up thinking about all kinds of bad stuff or composing shopping lists in my head when I’m meant to be focusing on my breathing. I can’t switch off this way and find it more relaxing to put funky music on and have a dance. Work out your own way of coping and pull on your resources when times get tough. You can’t stop shit happening but you don’t have to be at the mercy of how you feel.