10 tips to keep your sanity when you have chronic health problems

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Living with chronic health problems and long-term illness can push you to your limits physically, which in turn, can send you over the edge mentally. Having lived with Neutropenia and M.E (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) for many years now, I can verify that these illnesses have threatened to crack my sanity and spirit like a boiled egg shell hit repeatedly with a spoon.

In order to get through the rest of my life with some semblance of my mental health intact, I’ve developed several ways of coping and getting by that I’d like to share with you today.

1) There’s a lot of advice floating around about ‘accepting’ your situation and coming to terms with it and that’s all very well and good if you can do it. After 17 years of illness however, I am no closer to accepting it than I was at the beginning. I’ve now decided to accept that I can’t accept it and deal with that instead. I believe it’s healthier to feel all your feelings, even if the so-called negative ones such as anger, frustration, bitterness, envy, loss or regret. What I’ve discovered is that these feelings are fluid anyway and it’s impossible to stay feeling any one thing forever. If I allow the feelings to come without saying ‘I should have accepted this by now!’ they usually pass of their own accord and then I can get on with making the best of things.

2) Work out what your physical and mental limits in life are and stick to them. This is a lot more difficult than it sounds, but I’ve learned the hard way that ‘pushing myself’ is no longer an option. I’m done with payback and exhaustion from not listening to my mind and body.

3) In order to achieve 2) do not listen or pay attention to anyone who thinks you should be doing more. This is also a lot more difficult than it sounds but unless someone has the exact same conditions as you which affect them in the exact same ways, they have no place advising you on anything.

3) Forget about rigid time-management and organising your life. I tried this for years after I first got sick thinking it would help me maximise the time when I was well. What happened was that I had to change my plans and alter deadlines so much due to the unpredictable nature of my illness that I ended up feeling like a failure who couldn’t get things done. As difficult as it sounds, ‘going with the flow’ is a better mental approach for me than putting expectations on myself that I can’t live up to.

4) Prioritise instead and then you will be able to live with the lack of order in your life. My priorities are my health/self-care, work, partner, friends and family ( all at the top together ) Sadly, my goals and ambitions have to be lower priority because it’s just common sense that I can’t do everything at the pace I want to. Hence the sporadic blog posts, the years it took me to start getting my writing published and the YouTube channel that I’m desperate to develop, but which is moving along at a snail’s pace. Everything else like housework, decorating, crafts, reading etc is lumped together at the bottom of my priorities because if I kept up with them at the level I would like, the top priorities would suffer. Travel is nowhere on my list of priorities, even though if I was well I’d love to travel more. It takes so much energy that it is permanently on a back burner. Even going away for a few days results in payback and massive exhaustion. Trying to do everything will definitely send you insane.

5) If anyone has the audacity to say to your face they don’t believe your illness exists or that you aren’t really that sick, there are two simple steps you can follow. One is to talk to them and try to educate them about your illness and if this doesn’t work, you can go straight  to step two which is to remove them from your life via the nearest available exit. If that’s too brutal for you, try a gradual ‘phasing out’ so that you see and talk to them a lot less. These people are called ‘naysayers’ and they are one of the biggest threats to your sanity

6) Indulge yourself often. Living with health problems is 20 times more difficult than living a normal life, so regular treats are essential to stop insanity showing up on your radar. For me it’s clothes and I don’t care if I have too many or don’t need any more. I work very hard to keep my job whilst feeling awful and so if I spot a new leopard print item, I’m having it.

7) NEVER compare yourself to anyone else who is well. Comparing yourself to someone who is well is futile and also a bit silly. You might as well open the door to insanity and offer it a cup of tea.

8) Don’t feel you have to put on a brave face worse still, be ‘inspirational’. All of this can take energy and make you more ill from the effort.

9) But don’t moan a lot either, because this can also be very draining, for you and everyone else.

10) ‘Big up’ yourself and remember to congratulate yourself regularly on the achievement of surviving health issues. Not going insane takes considerable effort which can’t be underestimated. I said ‘well done’ to myself nine times yesterday!

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